Refugees and Asylum Seekers Situation – UK

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POPULATION
THE UK receives around 2500 applications every year. 2,435 applications were made in 2011 and of these 72% were refused. The UK is i home to less than 2% of the world’s refugees. In 2011 the estimated no. of refugees in the UK was 195,000 representing about 0.26% of the population.

ASYLUM PROCESS
A claimant is sent a place where they have to stay, known as dispersal, until their claim is decided by the UKBA and/or the Immigration Tribunal Service. Dispersal can be anywhere in the UK, where applicants are required to report regularly to a police station until their application is decided. Interviews will take place before a decision is made.

SUPPORT FOR ASYLUM SEEKERS
Cash:-Depending on their financial situation asylum seekers may be eligible for support from the government while their cases are being considered. A cash benefit of £36.62 per week for living expenses for a single adult. This compares to £67.50 that would be paid to a single unemployed citizen of the same age, who might also be eligible to receive additional benefits.

Housing:- Applicants cannot choose housing or where they live but will be sent to wherever the UKBA . Housing will be outside London and the South East.
Education Children of asylum seekers have the same right to education as all other children in the UK and must be in full time education the ages of five and sixteen years of age.
Health :- Adult asylum seekers and their dependants receive free primary and secondary health care although they may encounter difficulty with registration with a doctor.
Work :- (employment) Asylum seekers do NOT have permission to work in the UK.

WHEN A CLAIM IS SUCCESSFUL
If a refugee claim is successful the claimant is granted Refugee Status for five years (since2005). After five years the person will be able to apply for ‘Indefinite Leave to Remain in the UK to stay permanently. Once someone is granted protection they have right to work receive benefits and to be re-united with their spouse and children (under 18yrs. of age). However a child who is recognised as a refugee does NOT have the right to be joined with his/her parents or siblings.

IF A CLAIM IS REFUSED
The asylum seeker will become homeless as the UKBA stops financial support and the right to further education except for children of school age. The asylum seeker will still be allowed health services support but secondary health care will be charged. He/she will have no right to work. They may be made an offer to use IOM (Immigration Office Migration) voluntary repatriation scheme.

A fresh claim for review of their asylum claim can be made and might be granted by the Home Office, providing fresh evidence has been submitted. Following this an individual can apply for section 4 support, which includes housing and vouchers (no cash will be given).
Some individuals from certain nationalities may not even be allowed section 4 help after their claim has been rejected, so will be left homeless with no support from the government. The face detention and deportation.
.HOWEVER if the UKBA decides that an asylum seeker does not meet the criteria for refugee status the person may still be allowed to remain in the UK under a different status.
– ‘Discretionary Leave’ (DL) can be granted for up to three years and can be extended if the person cannot return home. Discretionary Leave is typically granted to children.
– Humanitarian Protection (HP) can be granted for five years if removing them would be a breach of the rights outlined in the outlined in the European Convention on Human Rights, for instance if they would be tortured on returning to their home country.
Those granted Discretionary Leave or Humanitarian Protection have the right to work, be reunited with their immediate families and to receive benefits.
Some individuals from some nationalities may not even be allowed section 4 help after their claim has been rejected, so left homeless with no support from the government. The face detention and deportation. HOWEVER if the UKBA decides that an asylum seeker does not meet the criteria for refugee status the person may still be allowed to remain in the UK under a different status such as ‘Discretionary Leave’ (DL) which can be granted for up to three years and can be extended if the person cannot return home. Discretionary Leave is typically granted to children.
Humanitarian Protection (HP) can be granted for five years if removing the asylum seeker would be a breach of the rights outlined in the European Convention on Human Rights, for instance if they would be tortured on returning to their home country.
Those granted Discretionary Leave or Humanitarian Protection have the right to work, be reunited with their immediate families and to receive benefits.

CHILDREN
1,277 children applied for asylum in 2011 having arrived in the country of refuge alone with no parent or guardian.
Detention of Asylum Seekers
In 2009, 1,000 children were detained with their parents for the purpose of immigration control.
In 2011, 64 children entered detention as asylum seekers (Refugee Council).
Asylum seekers are often kept in detention despite claiming that asylum is not a crime.At the end of 2012, – 2,685 were detained while waiting for their asylum applications to be processed or for decisions on their deportation were being made. (Migration Observatory)
There are 11 immigration removal centres across the UK (Immigration Centres).